The UK’s role in the militarisation of Nigeria’s oil region comes under fresh scrutiny in this new briefing Armed Extraction: The UK Military in Nigeria. The briefing highlights serious inadequacies in UK policy, the human rights impacts of military aid and the government’s lack of risk assessment and monitoring. The government has provided escalating levels of military aid to Nigerian troops patrolling the volatile Niger Delta region, where western companies like Shell have extracted oil for decades.

BOYCOTT Shell. Armed Extraction: The UK Military in Nigeria. A UK government official has raised questions over the impact of UK military aid to Nigeria, admitting that “we’ll never know how effective it is.” The government has provided escalating levels of military aid to Nigerian troops patrolling the volatile Niger Delta region, where western companies like Shell have extracted oil for decades.

The UK’s role in the militarisation of Nigeria’s oil region comes under fresh scrutiny in this new briefing Armed Extraction: The UK Military in Nigeria. The briefing highlights serious inadequacies in UK policy, the human rights impacts of military aid and the government’s lack of risk assessment and monitoring.
– See more at: http://platformlondon.org/p-publications/armed-extraction/#sthash.HTwWk46f.dpuf

Also like and share BOYCOTT Shell https://www.facebook.com/pages/BOYCOTT-Shell/193160320746514

Armed Extraction: The UK Military in Nigeria.

Aug 17, 2013 • 9:58 am

ArmedExtraction_coverA UK government official has raised questions over the impact of UK military aid to Nigeria, admitting that “we’ll never know how effective it is.” The government has provided escalating levels of military aid to Nigerian troops patrolling the volatile Niger Delta region, where western companies like Shell have extracted oil for decades.

The UK’s role in the militarisation of Nigeria’s oil region comes under fresh scrutiny in this new briefing  Armed Extraction: The UK Military in Nigeria. The briefing highlights serious inadequacies in UK policy, the human rights impacts of military aid and the government’s lack of risk assessment and monitoring.

Key findings include:

  • The Ministry of Defence (MoD) has spent £12 million on military aid in Nigeria since the UK revived ties with the regime in 2001. Since 2008, the Department for International Development (DfID) has spent additional amounts on “Security sector management and reform”, but it has not published exact figures or explanations for this.
  • Government memos reveal that Shell lobbied both the UK and US governments to increase military aid to Nigeria to ‘secure’ its oilfields.
  • A UK government official admits that the MoD does not monitor the impact of its military aid programme in Nigeria. Despite being aware of the risk that UK military aid could spark retaliation, the FCO made no risk assessments of the policy between 2008 and 2012.
  • The limited available data shows that the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) has approved arms and military exports to Nigeria worth at least £20.4 million, including projectile launchers and heavy machine guns.

Eager to get a slice of Nigeria’s growing ‘security’ market, the UK government has actively promoted security and military contracts in Nigeria to UK companies.

UK private military and security companies (PMSCs) like G4S, Executive Outcomes, Control Risks Group, Erinys and Saladin Security have all been awarded security contracts in the Delta region. These companies have profited from Nigeria’s oil conflict, which claimed an estimated 1,000 lives a year.

The briefing calls on the UK government to:

  • end all forms of oil-related military aid and arms exports to Nigeria;
  • condemn the widespread excessive use of force in Nigeria as a response to unrest in the Delta region; and
  • establish a legally binding mechanism to allow individuals and communities to hold UK companies accountable for human rights violations and environmental devastation.

Download the briefing here or browse online below.

 

– See more at: http://platformlondon.org/p-publications/armed-extraction/#sthash.HTwWk46f.jHLH9C5g.dpuf

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: